Saturday, October 29, 2011

Classifying the 17th Century: Part 1

The 17th century can cause some confusion, as there were four distinct fashion styles with four distinct names and it's hard to know what belongs to where and what came when and why is this book saying Jacobean clothes in one sentence and baroque clothes in the next? So here is your handy guide to classifying the 17th century.

Jacobean Period

The Jacobean Period refers to the reign of King James I (of England)/VI (of Scotland). James became king of Scotland in 1567 after the execution of his mother, Mary Queen of Scots. He became king of England in 1603, after the death of Queen Elizabeth I. This was a transitional period, where the late Elizabethan styles were still mostly in play. One of the defining features of the period is extensive use of heavy embroidery picturing natural motifs, with colorful flowers and animals swirling around on the fabric.

Men:


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Charles I as Prince of Wales circa 1612-13 by Robert Peake The Elder.

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Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset, by William Larkin, 1613.

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Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset, by Issac Oliver, 1616.


Women:


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Anne of Denmark, by John de Critz, c. 1605

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From 1616.

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Dorothy Cary, later Viscountess Rochford, by William Larkin, 1614-1618.

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Plimoth Plantation recreated an early 17th century embroidered jacket with truly spectacular results. Here's a picture of the finished project, and you can read all about the incredible endeavor here.



Cavalier Period

The Cavalier Period starts with the reign of King Charles I of England in 1625. It was a time of merriment and luxury, and the styles continued through the English Civil War. The main feature of this period is a raised waistline for both men and women. It moved to the middle of the torso, not quite as high as the under the bust empire styles we'll see in early 19th century womens wear, but not at the natural waist either. Heavy silk satins were the favored fabric.

Men:


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King Charles I by Daniel Mytens, 1631.

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King Charles I by Sir Anthony van Dyck, 1634.

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John Belasyse by Gilbert Jackson, 1636.

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Portrait of Lord John Stuart and his brother Lord Bernard Stuart (later Earl of Lichfield) by Sir Anthony van Dyck, c. 1638.


Women:


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A Lady of the Spencer family by Sir Anthony van Dyck, 1633-38.

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Queen Henrietta Maria of England, c. 1635.

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Queen Henrietta Maria of England with Sir Jeffrey Hudson by Sir Anthony van Dyck, c. 1633.

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Queen Henrietta Maria of England by Sir Anthony van Dyck, 1632-35.

8 comments:

  1. Its quite a stretch from then to now men were stunning and colorful today some stuffy ideas for dress why the change?
    Was I there ? in some sense i had to be. 147 01 24 1960 3:04am in all directions OTRTO. English Kelt

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  2. Sorry but, where are the other two names? You only mentioned jacobean and cavalier.
    thanks

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  3. Searched for this for a long time, classic and best.

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  4. I would like to see clothing of ordinary citizens. The shop keepers, farmers, blacksmiths, etc.

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  5. where are these other styles you talk about at the beginning, where is a conclusion, where is info about ordinary people????????

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